nomnomnom — regularly eat your cookies from Chromium

Cookies on websites both suck and are incredibly useful. They are useful because it’s convenient to not have to re-enter usernames and other stateful pieces of data. They suck because cookies are used to track you and they remember things that the website considers useful but you may not.

By the way, if you don’t have the EFF’s Privacy Badger extension installed, go install it. Privacy badger does care.

Let’s say you like to read the NYTimes but you may find that the 10 article limit per month to be a bit restrictive. After all, you go to your local library and read the gray lady there but sometimes well, you also re-read them online. But instead of reading the article you receive a bunch of indistinguishable-from-malware popups about reading more than 10 articles per month. How to get rid of them?

Well, you can just go clear your cookies in Chrome/Chromium. But chrome stores cookies in a SQLite database so you could make a script to go into the database, and remove offending entries. If you were to go and do that, say on Linux, you might end up with a SQL file like this:

delete from cookies where host_key LIKE '%nytimes%';

If that file was called nomnomnom.sql, you could have a script called nomnomnom.sql that did

#!/bin/bash 
CHROME_COOKIES=~/.config/chromium/Default/Cookies
sqlite3 $CHROME_COOKIES < ~/bin/nomnomnom.sql

Then you could add this to your crontab to say, get rid of the nytimes cookies everyday. As an example.

Advertisements