These are most of the books I read (and kept) from 2016. Skip Blockchain Revolution. It reads like a collection of headlines taken from blog posts.

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Top three on the shelf are (in no particular order):

  1. Disrupted, Dan Lyons
  2. Eccentric Orbits, John Bloom
  3. A Burglar’s Guide to the City, Geoff Manaugh

Top fiction this year was:

  1. Version Control, Dexter Palmer
  2. Mister Monkey, Francine Prose (not pictured)
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List of books that I’ve started but want to finish

  • The Glass Cage, Nicholas Carr
  • Armada, Ernest Cline
  • The Internet is not the Answer, Andrew Keen
  • Future Crimes, Marc Goodman
  • Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future, Ed Finn and Kathlyn Cramer
  • Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistle-Blower, Spy, Gabriella Coleman
  • The Age of Cryptocurrency, Paul Vigna
  • Seveneves, Neal Stephenson
  • Station Eleven, Emily St. John Mandel
  • The Story of Alice, Robert Douglas-Fairhurst
  • Surveillance after Snowden, Lyon
  • No Future for You: Salvos from The Baffler, John Summers, ed.
  • In Xanadu, William Dalrymple
  • Infinite Jest, David Foster Wallace
  • Countdown to Zeroday, Kim Zettler
  • Trigger Warning, Neil Gaiman

From, The Novel in Analog: Joshua Cohen’s Book of Numbers

As Cohen’s work reminds us, printed books are mostly private pleasures, lonely ones even. Unlike so much media today, they don’t target, watch, or measure us; they don’t flatter us with personalized stories based on accumulated data profiles (not yet, at least). But even as this essentially analog quality has convinced us that novels are doomed to be political dead zones, it has become one of their newfound attractions. “If you’re reading this on a screen, fuck off,” goes Book of Numbers’ opening line.

A list of random things going on in my life

A list of random things going on in my life

It’s been a while since I published anything personal on here. Not that I ever really did that, but I’ve been having some blogging guilt lately. I present the following unorganized list of things going on which you may, or more likely may-not find interesting. I tend to get introspective around birthdays that are divisible by five. This is a complete random collection of items. You have been warned.

Continue reading “A list of random things going on in my life”

Beowulf, Grendel, and the BeagleBone Black

My brother is a PhD candidate in a computational chemistry program. He occasionally asks me for help with some of the software he’s required to use. In the course of helping him, I’ve learned a few things about scientific software. The following are my observations:

  1. Scientists love Fortran. They love Fortran as much as a Linux systems programmer loves C and they will probably never leave it for the same reasons. There is apparently a lot of Fortran code out there and the effort to rewrite it would be immense. I’ve suggested to my brother to use wrappers in SciPy, a language with which he is more familiar, but the old guard insists on using Fortran.

  2. I think scientists-who-use-software don’t really get how to write cross-platform code. One package he showed me used a Make file (yeah!) but required you to edit a bunch of text config files first to specify the architecture and some paths and then run make.

  3. Despite these unfortunate realities, I feel that scientists are among the few who use computers for their full potential. It saddens me that the raw computational power in your smart phone is being used to so that you can click like on a post.

There was only so much help I could provide my brother because I really didn’t know anything about the software being used in massive clusters. So when Packt publishing offered me a chance to review Building a BeagleBone Black Super Cluster by Andreas Reichel, I was interested. My cluster operations knowledge is very limited, but I’m pretty familiar with the BeagleBone so I thought this book might be a good way to learn more.

A pack of BeagleBones found in the wild found in a cluster formation.
A pack of BeagleBones found in the wild found in a cluster formation.

I enjoyed reading Andreas’ approach to the topic. He brings a certain academic perspective to the BeagleBone which is a bit refreshing in a way. In the preface and his introduction he puts the BeagleBone in historical context of computing history which was enjoyable to read.

He then continues to describe how to build a small cluster of BeagleBones. He made a custom mount of ten BeagleBone blacks. The details on how to build the enclosure are complete including how to hack an ATX power supply to power everything. I thought the set up was particularly clever.

The rest of the book describes how to use open source scientific software to run on this cluster. The examples seem very complete including providing details on source code modifications that need to be performed before compiling. This confirms my impression of scientific software 🙂

The book is approachable by more than just academics. I think there is a growing citizen-scientist movement who would benefit from learning more about parallel computing, especially in the areas of simulation and modeling. There are the occasional Hackaday posts the mentions clusters if you are looking for applications. One post describes a 33 Raspberry Pi cluster and the other an eight-node clustered webserver.

Now if my brother asks for help, I still really won’t understand what he’s doing, but I’ll at least have some background on how the software tools should work.

BeagleBone for Secret Agents just $5 for a limited time

For all the hardware hackers looking for a gift, either for yourself or for others, BeagleBone for Secret Agents is only $5 as an eBook until January 6th! Actually, all Packt eBooks are on sale for the same price until then. Also, all Packt eBooks are DRM-free and I’m very happy to have a book with a publisher that supports this.

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So, if you have a long flight to the in-laws this year1, stock up on some eBooks!


  1. I love you Mom and Dad! ;) 

My small cameo in “Building Open Source Hardware”

My small cameo in “Building Open Source Hardware”

Building Open Source Hardware, by Alicia Gibb, is now available! I received my copy tonight and just by flipping through it I can tell it is an impressive collaborative effort that captures the zeitgeist of the OSHW movement. There are over 16 contributing authors who share their expertise in areas such as wearables, licensing, design, manufacturing, materials, and documentation. I’ll post a proper review once I’ve completed reading it.

All proceeds of this book go to the Open Source Hardware Association.
All proceeds of this book go to the Open Source Hardware Association.

I’m also proud to announce that a very small contribution of mine made it into this book. I wrote a brief essay of OSHW Security Do’s and Don’ts which unabashedly occupies Appendix B. There are no shocking revelations — just some good common sense practices.

If you are involved in any way with OSHW, you should like this book. But you don’t have to take my word for it.

Let's hear it for all the Appendix Bs out there!
Let’s hear it for all the Appendix Bs out there!