List of books that I’ve started but want to finish

  • The Glass Cage, Nicholas Carr
  • Armada, Ernest Cline
  • The Internet is not the Answer, Andrew Keen
  • Future Crimes, Marc Goodman
  • Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future, Ed Finn and Kathlyn Cramer
  • Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistle-Blower, Spy, Gabriella Coleman
  • The Age of Cryptocurrency, Paul Vigna
  • Seveneves, Neal Stephenson
  • Station Eleven, Emily St. John Mandel
  • The Story of Alice, Robert Douglas-Fairhurst
  • Surveillance after Snowden, Lyon
  • No Future for You: Salvos from The Baffler, John Summers, ed.
  • In Xanadu, William Dalrymple
  • Infinite Jest, David Foster Wallace
  • Countdown to Zeroday, Kim Zettler
  • Trigger Warning, Neil Gaiman
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From, The Novel in Analog: Joshua Cohen’s Book of Numbers

As Cohen’s work reminds us, printed books are mostly private pleasures, lonely ones even. Unlike so much media today, they don’t target, watch, or measure us; they don’t flatter us with personalized stories based on accumulated data profiles (not yet, at least). But even as this essentially analog quality has convinced us that novels are doomed to be political dead zones, it has become one of their newfound attractions. “If you’re reading this on a screen, fuck off,” goes Book of Numbers’ opening line.

A list of random things going on in my life

A list of random things going on in my life

It’s been a while since I published anything personal on here. Not that I ever really did that, but I’ve been having some blogging guilt lately. I present the following unorganized list of things going on which you may, or more likely may-not find interesting. I tend to get introspective around birthdays that are divisible by five. This is a complete random collection of items. You have been warned.

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My small cameo in “Building Open Source Hardware”

My small cameo in “Building Open Source Hardware”

Building Open Source Hardware, by Alicia Gibb, is now available! I received my copy tonight and just by flipping through it I can tell it is an impressive collaborative effort that captures the zeitgeist of the OSHW movement. There are over 16 contributing authors who share their expertise in areas such as wearables, licensing, design, manufacturing, materials, and documentation. I’ll post a proper review once I’ve completed reading it.

All proceeds of this book go to the Open Source Hardware Association.
All proceeds of this book go to the Open Source Hardware Association.

I’m also proud to announce that a very small contribution of mine made it into this book. I wrote a brief essay of OSHW Security Do’s and Don’ts which unabashedly occupies Appendix B. There are no shocking revelations — just some good common sense practices.

If you are involved in any way with OSHW, you should like this book. But you don’t have to take my word for it.

Let's hear it for all the Appendix Bs out there!
Let’s hear it for all the Appendix Bs out there!

Banned Books Week 2014

Banned Books Week 2014

My initial reaction to Banned Books Week, which is this week, was “oh, this when we remember how we used to ban books back in the 50s.” I went to the Banned Books Week website and found a pamphlet that shows the banned or challenged books, in 2013! Looking over the list, I’m incredulous that books like the Margaret Atwood’s Handmaid’s Tale, and Diary of Anne Frank, which a Northville, Michigan middle school try to ban, are still routinely challenged.

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My top eBooks picks from Packt

My top eBooks picks from Packt

Packt Publishing is offering a buy one, get one free deal on eBooks until March 26th. What I like about Packt is that they have some very niche books, like a book on Gnucash! I was curious about what other books they had and I made a list of my favorites below.

BeagleBone

Packt has three books on the BeagleBone listed below. They all look a good source for BeagleBone project ideas if you are looking for a next project.

Raspberry Pi

Security / Networking

  • CISSP in 21 Days: During breaks in my graduate program1, when I haven’t had a test for a while, I sometimes feel the urge to take a test and this one is usually on the list.

  • Traffic Analysis with Tshark How-to: Wireshark rocks; Tshark is wireshark on the command line, which rocks more.

Functional Programming

Packt seems to have a number of books on Clojure2 and the following looked interesting:

Misc


  1. Only one class left! 

  2. I actually searched “lisp”, but I’ll take Clojure. 
  3. I can never remember the find syntax. I do use zsh’s echo **/*.pattern a lot. 
  4. Leslie Lamport, the main developer behind \LaTeX, has been recently awarded the ACM Turing Award 

Building a Home Security System with BeagleBone: A Review

Building a Home Security System with BeagleBone, by Bill Pretty, is an excellent collection of DIY projects. He unmasks common home security techniques in a clear and concise manner for hobbyists. There are several fun and practical projects that make you feel a bit like a super-spy as you build up a system of motion, infrared, and acoustic sensors.

9602OT_Cov

Continue reading “Building a Home Security System with BeagleBone: A Review”